Speakers get exhibitor training in New York City

I recently had the privilege to address an audience of professional speakers at the National Speakers Association’s annual convention in New York City. The theme of the event was NSA Rocks! and I have to tell you it was a rocking good time.  That infectious theme set the pace for the tempo of the event months before nearly 2000 speakers decended on the city that never sleeps.  As a new member of NSA I was truly honored to be selected as one of the concurrent session speakers.  I was concerned that my topic ” Exhibit Like and Expert” might not have peak the interest of the attendees, even though I knew the content of what I was to share would provide valuable, money making instructions to this talented group.  My session was well attended and the feedback I received immediately after my presentation was positive and engaging. My book sold out at the bookstore and the fact that attendees sought me out the day after to talk, convinced me that my message was relevant and appreciated.  I think it went very well.  Enough about me. The conference was incredible and I met so many fabulous people, heard so many incredible speakers and learned so much about how to improve my speaking business that my brain was about to explode.  I am so grateful to have attended and I know that particular conference will go down as one of the best.  I am excited that the 2009 NSA Conference will be in Phoenix next year.

Here are a few of the suggestions and observations I had for speakers about exhibiting.  Many speakers don’t realize that when they leave the stage and go to their table in the back of the room that they are still being judged by their audience.  A speaker should make sure the professional image attendees see on the stage is carried through to their product display. The same principals of good display design and merchandising that apply to an exhibitor in a tradeshow should apply to them.   If they are the best in their field and commanding top dollar for their presentation then their display should look fabulous. 

Unfortunately many highly respected and successful speakers miss this important fact. The presentation you create at your display table should match the professionalism and personality of the presentation you demonstrated on the platform.  What impression does a buyer or potential employer get when they stop to chat at yours?  Are your books in several piles on the table with order forms spread about?  Are CD’s stacked up next to a type written tent card listing the prices?  Do you spread everything out on the hotel’s table cloth stained from the morning breakfast?   You deserve better branding than that.  A simple yet inviting, portable display that attractively elevates your samples and beautifully merchandises your products would make a better impression. Add an eye-catching graphic with quotes from your satisfied customers and an enlarged reprint of your latest book cover and you will be more memorable.  The speakers and consultants I work with assure me that since investing in a personalized and professionally designed display they have experienced a difference in the public’s perception of the quality of their talents and seen increases in the sales of their products. Some have found the exhibiting experience so valuable that they now negotiate for an exhibit booth along with their speaking and consulting fees when it is available.  Maybe it’s time you took a second look at the benefits of exhibiting?

 

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1 Response to “Speakers get exhibitor training in New York City”


  1. 1 Jean R. McFarland, Ph.D. September 3, 2008 at 3:11 pm

    Hi Susan,

    One particular phrase caught my eye: “A simple yet inviting, portable display that attractively elevates your samples and beautifully merchandises your products.”

    Elevating one’s samples would make a tremendous difference in visibility and “curb” appeal.

    Great tip.

    Jean McFarland
    http://www.FifthDimensionStrategies.com


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